September 26, 2014

Gustave Caillebotte, Un Balcon, 1880

September 26, 2014

Gustave Courbet, Burial at Ornans, 1849-50

12:17am
  
Filed under: courbet gustave courbet 
September 26, 2014
lacma:

"A painting is not about an experience. It is an experience." -Mark Rothko, born on this day in 1903. 
[Mark Rothko. White Center. 1957]

lacma:

"A painting is not about an experience. It is an experience." -Mark Rothko, born on this day in 1903. 

[Mark Rothko. White Center. 1957]

(via floating-world-pictures)

September 26, 2014

'don't miss a sec' by Monica Bonvicini, at Louisiana Museum, 2004

'don't miss a sec' by Monica Bonvicini, at Louisiana Museum, 2004

(Source: hypnoide, via miraclefabric)

September 26, 2014

theenergyissue:

Olafur Eliasson’s “Riverbed” Converts a Museum into a Natural Landscape

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations employing elemental materials like light, water, earth, and even atmosphere, transformed an entire wing of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art into a riverbed for his first solo exhibition. The work, which uses rocks, soil, and running water to precisely emulate a natural landscape, stands in stark contrast to the white walls of one of Denmark’s most important Modernist buildings. Originally designed in 1958 by architects Jørgen Bo and Wilhlem Wohlert, the Louisiana’s staggered, irregularly sized portals create an experience that highlights movement through space. By filling the Louisiana with a landscape its galleries might have replaced, Eliasson heightens the haptic qualities of this experience and points to the reality of the museum as an institution and a physical locality. The work raises the question of how natural and built environments might intersect, though it is up to the viewer to decide whether this tension is constructive or destructive.

(Source: dezeen.com, via miraclefabric)

12:04am
  
Filed under: olafur eliasson 
September 16, 2014

lostinpublications:

The house is quiet. They have gone to bed, leaving me alone, and the electric timer has just switched off the living-room lights. It feels like the house has finally turned on its side to fall asleep. Years ago I would have gone through my mother’s purse for one of her cigarettes and smoked in the dark. It was a magical time that the house was mine.

Tonight, however, I am restless. I sit at the dining-room table; rummage through the refrigerator. What am I looking for?

All day long I’ve been scavenging, poking around in rooms and closets, peering at their things, studying them. I arrange my rolls of exposed film into long rows and count and recount them as if they were lost. There are twenty-eight.

What drives me to continue this work is difficult to name. It has more to do with love than with sociology, with being a subject in the drama rather than a witness. And in the odd and jumbled process of working everything shifts; the boundaries blur, my distance slips, the arrogance and illusion of immunity falters. I wake up in the middle of the night, stunned and anguished. These are my parents. From that simple fact, everything follows. I realize that beyond the rolls of film and the few good pictures, the demands of my project and my confusion about its meaning, is the wish to take photography literally. To stop time. I want my parents to live forever.

Larry Sultan: An excerpt from Chapter One of Pictures From Home, 1992

(via enlarged-heart)

September 6, 2014
lveart:

Anthony CaroMirror (2013)
steel and blue perspex 130 x 122 x 86.5 cm (ref:AC1793)

lveart:

Anthony Caro
Mirror (2013)

steel and blue perspex 
130 x 122 x 86.5 cm (ref:AC1793)

September 6, 2014
lveart:

Anthony CaroTrestle (2012/2013)
oak wood140.5 x 137.5 x 40.5 (ref:AC1789)

lveart:

Anthony Caro
Trestle (2012/2013)

oak wood
140.5 x 137.5 x 40.5 (ref:AC1789)

September 6, 2014
lveart:

Anthony CaroAlpine (2012)
steel and yellow perspex151 x 125 x 66 cm (ref:AC1792)

lveart:

Anthony Caro
Alpine (2012)

steel and yellow perspex
151 x 125 x 66 cm (ref:AC1792)

September 2, 2014
photographsrenderedinplaydoh:

Original photograph: Nude (1936) by Edward Weston

photographsrenderedinplaydoh:

Original photograph: Nude (1936) by Edward Weston

September 2, 2014
photographsrenderedinplaydoh:

Original photograph: Fort Collins, Colorado, 1976 by Robert Adams

photographsrenderedinplaydoh:

Original photograph: Fort Collins, Colorado, 1976 by Robert Adams

August 12, 2014

Robin Williams, 1951-2014

(Source: theworthlesspeon, via salesonfilm)

11:39pm
  
Filed under: louie robin williams 
August 12, 2014

classicstarlite:

Thanks for playing with us, Robin.

11:38pm
  
Filed under: hook 1991 robin williams 
August 5, 2014
thefilmstage:


We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily.
It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital information will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.
Our industry – our filmmakers – rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.

Martin Scorsese's statement on Kodak’s decision to continue producing film stock.

thefilmstage:

We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily.

It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital information will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.

Our industry – our filmmakers – rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.

Martin Scorsese's statement on Kodak’s decision to continue producing film stock.

(via salesonfilm)

August 2, 2014

gyroscopeprints:

Robert Adams, Our Lives and Our Children, via featured artist Darin Mickey.

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